A walk through Capri is like a walk through a museum. Villas, historical sites and paths, contribute to creating a unique and unforgettable cultural experience even to the most discerning visitor. Here are a few villas and museums which we recommend visiting during your stay on the island of Capri.

La Certosa di San Giacomo
Built in 1371 by Count Giacomo Arcucci, la Certosa di San Giacomo is the most ancient building in Capri and comprises of three separate blocks. The convent is made up of the rooms for the friars, the guests, the stables, the granaries, and the laboratories. In the same premises one can also find a church with a pharmacy and the convent for the cloistered nuns
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Villa San Michele
Villa San Michele was built by Swedish physician Axel Munthe, and it is famous for its panoramic gardens, from which one can enjoy the view of Capri, the Sorrento Peninsula, and Mount Vesuvius. The Villa is adorned with relics from the classic period and from ancient Egypt.
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The Gardens of Augusto
The botanical gardens of Augusto are made of a series of terraces overlying each other. From there one can enjoy the view of the Faraglioni, Marina Piccola and Via Krupp. The latter was built under orders from German industrialist Friedrich Alfred Krupp at the beginning of the Twentieth century, who wanted a more expedite way to reach his house on Quisisana, from his boat moored in Marina Piccola. Via Krupp leads up to the Certosa di San Giacomo and to the Gardens of Augusto.
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The Phoenician Steps
The Phoenician Steps connect Marina Grande to Anacapri. Until only a few years ago, it was believed that the steps had been built by the Phoenicians. Recent historical research has revealed that the steps were, in reality, constructed by the Ancient Greeks, between the 7th and 6th century B.C. The path is 1,7km long, and comprises of 921 steps, which pass throughout a wooded area and in front of a chapel dedicated to Saint’ Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Anacapri. The steps keep on ascending toward the cliff of Capodimonte. On the way up, one can notice a series of crosses carved into the stone by order of the Bishops of Capri so as to ask for divine protection against evil spirits and the frequent rock falls which landed on the steps. The Phoenician Steps end in front of Saint Michael’s chapel and the Porta della Differenza, which marks the boundary between Capri and Anacapri.
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